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TEST KITCHEN

The latest thoughts on diet, exercise, recipes, trends and products.

Avoiding Ultra-Processed Foods

The term "ultra-processed" is a common buzzword in health-related news. You may have wondered how it relates to your daily diet. The term can be a bit confusing since most foods involve some form of processing. Chemically processed foods offer limited nutritional value and can be harmful to your health. Here's the scoop on ultra-processed foods and how to limit your intake of these items.

 

What Are Ultra-Processed Foods?

Ultra-processed foods undergo chemical processing. These products are high in fats, oils, and sugar. They also contain other substances including hydrogenated oils, protein isolates, and modified starches.

Ultra-processed items undergo a variety of processing methods. These include:

 

• Hydrogenation

• Hydrolysis

• Reshaping

• Molding

• Pre-processing for frying

 

Ultra-processed foods are often called "cosmetic foods." These items are generally unhealthy and offer empty calories with little nutritional value.

 

Types of Processed Foods

Most of the food you eat undergoes some type of processing. Not all processed foods are bad for your health.

Some processing ensures freshness or enhances nutritional value. But other foods are processed beyond recognition.

 

Non-Processed Food

Non-processed foods are whole foods that haven't undergone any form of processing. Raw fruits and vegetables are non-processed since they are in a natural state.

 

Minimally Processed Food

With minimal processing, foods undergo slight changes. The food may be washed, sliced, peeled, or dried to make them easier to eat or more convenient for the consumer. Pasteurized milk undergoes a process to extend its shelf life and prevent bacterial growth. Shelled nuts undergo minimal processing to make them easier to consume.

 

Moderately Processed Food

 

Moderately processed food is modified to a greater degree than minimally processed items. These foods are often mixed, cooked, prepared, or packaged before consumption. Canned vegetables, peanut butter, and pasta are examples of this kind of processing.

 

Ultra-Processed Foods

Ultra-processing results in foods with long lists of ingredients, fillers, additives, and preservatives. Food companies use these chemicals to enhance flavor, add texture, prolong shelf life, and add to the nutritional profile of some food products. Convenience foods, processed meat, salty snacks, and baked treats are examples of this type of enhanced processing.

 

Ultra Processed Foods List

What's in your pantry? Is it filled with processed foods? These foods are everywhere. You may eat them every day without realizing what you're consuming. Here are some processed foods to avoid:

  •  
  • • Sugary drinks including soda, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet tea, and fruit juice
  • • Frozen meals
  • • Fast food
  • • Processed meats including cold cuts, bacon, beef jerky, and salami
  • • Sweet snacks including brownies, cake, ice cream, and candy
  • • Salty snacks including crackers, microwave popcorn, potato chips, and pretzels
  • • Refined grains including white bread, white pasta, and instant noodles

 

Not all snacks are equal in their nutritional value. More and more, companies are realizing that a growing group of consumers are looking for convenient and healthy snack items.  Energy bars and protein bars with healthy ingredients and minimal processing can be a part of a healthy diet.

 

Lowering Your Intake of Processed Foods

If you find your diet consists of too many ultra-processed foods, it's easy to cut back. A few simple changes can improve your diet and your overall health.

 

Start Slow

It's hard to change your diet overnight. If you want to eat healthier, it's a good idea to start slow and make changes you can live with. Cut down on sugary drinks and trips to your favorite fast-food restaurant. Eat at home instead of on the run. Small changes you make now can become healthy habits you can sustain over time.

 

Plan Your Meals

Taking some time to plan your meals for the week is a great idea. It's the best way to ensure you're eating a healthy, balanced diet. Try a couple of recipes, and make enough to have leftovers for a day or two. Buy fresh whole foods, including fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and healthy snacks.

 

Shop With Purpose

Making positive changes in your diet starts with smart shopping. Before you head to the grocery store, have a list to make shopping easier and less tempting. Be sure to shop the perimeter of the store. This is where you'll find fresh fruits and vegetables. Most convenience foods, including highly processed items, are in the middle aisles of most grocery stores.

 

Add Fresh Items to Your Meals

Do you find yourself buying fruits and vegetables that you never eat? It's a common problem for people with busy schedules or other responsibilities. Make a plan to add fresh fruit and vegetables to your daily meals. Add a piece of fruit to your breakfast plate, a salad with your lunch, and some steamed veggies with your dinner.

 

Include Whole Grains in Your Diet

Carbohydrates are not all bad. Complex carbohydrates are an important part of a healthy diet. Try replacing refined grains with whole grains. Whole grain bread and pasta are good choices. Barley, quinoa, bulgar, and buckwheat are healthy choices as well.

 

Avoiding Ultra-Processed Foods

Take a look at the foods you eat every day. The goal is to eat healthy, whole foods and start avoiding ultra-processed foods. It's hard to change your eating habits overnight. So, start small and incorporate a few changes for a healthier lifestyle. Planning ahead for your meals and healthy snacks is a great way to begin. Before you go, take a look at our website and natural and delicious energy and protein bars. At RBar, we create all our products with your health in mind. Contact us today to learn more.  

Find RBar Protein on Amazon.com

TEST KITCHEN

The latest thoughts on diet, exercise, recipes, trends and products.

Avoiding Ultra-Processed Foods

The term "ultra-processed" is a common buzzword in health-related news. You may have wondered how it relates to your daily diet. The term can be a bit confusing since most foods involve some form of processing. Chemically processed foods offer limited nutritional value and can be harmful to your health. Here's the scoop on ultra-processed foods and how to limit your intake of these items.

 

What Are Ultra-Processed Foods?

Ultra-processed foods undergo chemical processing. These products are high in fats, oils, and sugar. They also contain other substances including hydrogenated oils, protein isolates, and modified starches.

Ultra-processed items undergo a variety of processing methods. These include:

 

• Hydrogenation

• Hydrolysis

• Reshaping

• Molding

• Pre-processing for frying

 

Ultra-processed foods are often called "cosmetic foods." These items are generally unhealthy and offer empty calories with little nutritional value.

 

Types of Processed Foods

Most of the food you eat undergoes some type of processing. Not all processed foods are bad for your health.

Some processing ensures freshness or enhances nutritional value. But other foods are processed beyond recognition.

 

Non-Processed Food

Non-processed foods are whole foods that haven't undergone any form of processing. Raw fruits and vegetables are non-processed since they are in a natural state.

 

Minimally Processed Food

With minimal processing, foods undergo slight changes. The food may be washed, sliced, peeled, or dried to make them easier to eat or more convenient for the consumer. Pasteurized milk undergoes a process to extend its shelf life and prevent bacterial growth. Shelled nuts undergo minimal processing to make them easier to consume.

 

Moderately Processed Food

 

Moderately processed food is modified to a greater degree than minimally processed items. These foods are often mixed, cooked, prepared, or packaged before consumption. Canned vegetables, peanut butter, and pasta are examples of this kind of processing.

 

Ultra-Processed Foods

Ultra-processing results in foods with long lists of ingredients, fillers, additives, and preservatives. Food companies use these chemicals to enhance flavor, add texture, prolong shelf life, and add to the nutritional profile of some food products. Convenience foods, processed meat, salty snacks, and baked treats are examples of this type of enhanced processing.

 

Ultra Processed Foods List

What's in your pantry? Is it filled with processed foods? These foods are everywhere. You may eat them every day without realizing what you're consuming. Here are some processed foods to avoid:

  •  
  • • Sugary drinks including soda, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet tea, and fruit juice
  • • Frozen meals
  • • Fast food
  • • Processed meats including cold cuts, bacon, beef jerky, and salami
  • • Sweet snacks including brownies, cake, ice cream, and candy
  • • Salty snacks including crackers, microwave popcorn, potato chips, and pretzels
  • • Refined grains including white bread, white pasta, and instant noodles

 

Not all snacks are equal in their nutritional value. More and more, companies are realizing that a growing group of consumers are looking for convenient and healthy snack items.  Energy bars and protein bars with healthy ingredients and minimal processing can be a part of a healthy diet.

 

Lowering Your Intake of Processed Foods

If you find your diet consists of too many ultra-processed foods, it's easy to cut back. A few simple changes can improve your diet and your overall health.

 

Start Slow

It's hard to change your diet overnight. If you want to eat healthier, it's a good idea to start slow and make changes you can live with. Cut down on sugary drinks and trips to your favorite fast-food restaurant. Eat at home instead of on the run. Small changes you make now can become healthy habits you can sustain over time.

 

Plan Your Meals

Taking some time to plan your meals for the week is a great idea. It's the best way to ensure you're eating a healthy, balanced diet. Try a couple of recipes, and make enough to have leftovers for a day or two. Buy fresh whole foods, including fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and healthy snacks.

 

Shop With Purpose

Making positive changes in your diet starts with smart shopping. Before you head to the grocery store, have a list to make shopping easier and less tempting. Be sure to shop the perimeter of the store. This is where you'll find fresh fruits and vegetables. Most convenience foods, including highly processed items, are in the middle aisles of most grocery stores.

 

Add Fresh Items to Your Meals

Do you find yourself buying fruits and vegetables that you never eat? It's a common problem for people with busy schedules or other responsibilities. Make a plan to add fresh fruit and vegetables to your daily meals. Add a piece of fruit to your breakfast plate, a salad with your lunch, and some steamed veggies with your dinner.

 

Include Whole Grains in Your Diet

Carbohydrates are not all bad. Complex carbohydrates are an important part of a healthy diet. Try replacing refined grains with whole grains. Whole grain bread and pasta are good choices. Barley, quinoa, bulgar, and buckwheat are healthy choices as well.

 

Avoiding Ultra-Processed Foods

Take a look at the foods you eat every day. The goal is to eat healthy, whole foods and start avoiding ultra-processed foods. It's hard to change your eating habits overnight. So, start small and incorporate a few changes for a healthier lifestyle. Planning ahead for your meals and healthy snacks is a great way to begin. Before you go, take a look at our website and natural and delicious energy and protein bars. At RBar, we create all our products with your health in mind. Contact us today to learn more.  

Find RBar Protein on Amazon.com

TEST KITCHEN

The latest thoughts on diet, exercise, recipes, trends and products.

The term "ultra-processed" is a common buzzword in health-related news. You may have wondered how it relates to your daily diet. The term can be a bit confusing since most foods involve some form of processing. Chemically processed foods offer limited nutritional value and can be harmful to your health. Here's the scoop on ultra-processed foods and how to limit your intake of these items.

 

What Are Ultra-Processed Foods?

Ultra-processed foods undergo chemical processing. These products are high in fats, oils, and sugar. They also contain other substances including hydrogenated oils, protein isolates, and modified starches.

Ultra-processed items undergo a variety of processing methods. These include:

 

• Hydrogenation

• Hydrolysis

• Reshaping

• Molding

• Pre-processing for frying

 

Ultra-processed foods are often called "cosmetic foods." These items are generally unhealthy and offer empty calories with little nutritional value.

 

Types of Processed Foods

Most of the food you eat undergoes some type of processing. Not all processed foods are bad for your health.

Some processing ensures freshness or enhances nutritional value. But other foods are processed beyond recognition.

 

Non-Processed Food

Non-processed foods are whole foods that haven't undergone any form of processing. Raw fruits and vegetables are non-processed since they are in a natural state.

 

Minimally Processed Food

With minimal processing, foods undergo slight changes. The food may be washed, sliced, peeled, or dried to make them easier to eat or more convenient for the consumer. Pasteurized milk undergoes a process to extend its shelf life and prevent bacterial growth. Shelled nuts undergo minimal processing to make them easier to consume.

 

Moderately Processed Food

 

Moderately processed food is modified to a greater degree than minimally processed items. These foods are often mixed, cooked, prepared, or packaged before consumption. Canned vegetables, peanut butter, and pasta are examples of this kind of processing.

 

Ultra-Processed Foods

Ultra-processing results in foods with long lists of ingredients, fillers, additives, and preservatives. Food companies use these chemicals to enhance flavor, add texture, prolong shelf life, and add to the nutritional profile of some food products. Convenience foods, processed meat, salty snacks, and baked treats are examples of this type of enhanced processing.

 

Ultra Processed Foods List

What's in your pantry? Is it filled with processed foods? These foods are everywhere. You may eat them every day without realizing what you're consuming. Here are some processed foods to avoid:

  •  
  • • Sugary drinks including soda, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet tea, and fruit juice
  • • Frozen meals
  • • Fast food
  • • Processed meats including cold cuts, bacon, beef jerky, and salami
  • • Sweet snacks including brownies, cake, ice cream, and candy
  • • Salty snacks including crackers, microwave popcorn, potato chips, and pretzels
  • • Refined grains including white bread, white pasta, and instant noodles

 

Not all snacks are equal in their nutritional value. More and more, companies are realizing that a growing group of consumers are looking for convenient and healthy snack items.  Energy bars and protein bars with healthy ingredients and minimal processing can be a part of a healthy diet.

 

Lowering Your Intake of Processed Foods

If you find your diet consists of too many ultra-processed foods, it's easy to cut back. A few simple changes can improve your diet and your overall health.

 

Start Slow

It's hard to change your diet overnight. If you want to eat healthier, it's a good idea to start slow and make changes you can live with. Cut down on sugary drinks and trips to your favorite fast-food restaurant. Eat at home instead of on the run. Small changes you make now can become healthy habits you can sustain over time.

 

Plan Your Meals

Taking some time to plan your meals for the week is a great idea. It's the best way to ensure you're eating a healthy, balanced diet. Try a couple of recipes, and make enough to have leftovers for a day or two. Buy fresh whole foods, including fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and healthy snacks.

 

Shop With Purpose

Making positive changes in your diet starts with smart shopping. Before you head to the grocery store, have a list to make shopping easier and less tempting. Be sure to shop the perimeter of the store. This is where you'll find fresh fruits and vegetables. Most convenience foods, including highly processed items, are in the middle aisles of most grocery stores.

 

Add Fresh Items to Your Meals

Do you find yourself buying fruits and vegetables that you never eat? It's a common problem for people with busy schedules or other responsibilities. Make a plan to add fresh fruit and vegetables to your daily meals. Add a piece of fruit to your breakfast plate, a salad with your lunch, and some steamed veggies with your dinner.

 

Include Whole Grains in Your Diet

Carbohydrates are not all bad. Complex carbohydrates are an important part of a healthy diet. Try replacing refined grains with whole grains. Whole grain bread and pasta are good choices. Barley, quinoa, bulgar, and buckwheat are healthy choices as well.

 

Avoiding Ultra-Processed Foods

Take a look at the foods you eat every day. The goal is to eat healthy, whole foods and start avoiding ultra-processed foods. It's hard to change your eating habits overnight. So, start small and incorporate a few changes for a healthier lifestyle. Planning ahead for your meals and healthy snacks is a great way to begin. Before you go, take a look at our website and natural and delicious energy and protein bars. At RBar, we create all our products with your health in mind. Contact us today to learn more.  

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